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Language and Cognition

Informacje ogólne

Kod przedmiotu: 2500-EN-F-226 Kod Erasmus / ISCED: 14.4 / (0313) Psychologia
Nazwa przedmiotu: Language and Cognition
Jednostka: Wydział Psychologii
Grupy: Academic basket
electives for 1 and 2 year
Punkty ECTS i inne: (brak)
zobacz reguły punktacji
Język prowadzenia: angielski
Rodzaj przedmiotu:

fakultatywne

Skrócony opis: (tylko po angielsku)

The course draws on experimental psychology, linguistics and

neuroscience to help students appreciate the cognitive mechanisms

underlying language.

The material centers on topics related to language processing as well as

learning. In order to better contextualize language in the mind, students

learn about how language interacts with other aspects of cognition,

including attention, memory and awareness. They also learn about

language breakdown after stroke and in other impairments.

By the end of the course students should be able to apply their

knowledge to their further academic research, should they wish to pursue

it, as well as language learning and teaching, and rehabilitation.

Pełny opis: (tylko po angielsku)

The course draws on experimental psychology, linguistics and

neuroscience to help students appreciate the cognitive mechanisms

underlying language. How is word meaning represented in the mind? How

do we formulate grammatical sentences? Why is acquiring language in

adulthood harder than in childhood? Does our gender, genes or talent

have any influence on how we acquire and use language? What do

language impairments tell us about the mind? And finally, how are all

these processes affected when there are two or more languages in one

mind?

The material centers on language processing as well as learning, both in

children and adults. In order to better contextualize language in the mind,

students also learn about how language interacts with other aspects of

cognition, including attention, memory and awareness. They also learn

about language breakdown after stroke and other impairments.

During the course students see how the methods used to address these

questions have developed over time and learn about the opportunities

offered by recent advances in neuroimaging. They build the foundations

needed to formulate their own opinions on the enduring debates,

including nature versus nurture, rationalism versus empiricism,

generativism versus emergentism, as well as understanding state of the

art research in the field.

By the end of the course students should be able to apply their

knowledge to their further academic research, should they wish to pursue

it, as well as language learning and teaching, and rehabilitation.

Literatura: (tylko po angielsku)

Key textbooks for most of the course are:

 Harley, T. A. (2010). Talking the talk: language, psychology and

science. Psychology Press. [Available as an ebook]

 Traxler, M.J. (2012). Introduction to Psycholinguistics. Wiley-Blackwell.

[Available in the library]

Recommended, easy reading to grasp the main ideas quickly:

 Fromkin, V., Rodman, R. & Hyams, N. (2010). Introduction to

Language. [Available as an Ebook]. The 11th edition is to be released

very soon. It’s a perennial bestseller blending humour with broad

coverage of the material which is made easily accessible.

Other:

 Aitchison, J. (2011). The Articulate Mammal. An Introduction to

Psycholinguistics. Routledge.

 Pinker, S. (1994/2007). Language Instinct. How Mind Creates

Language. New York, NY: Harper Perennial Modern Classics.

The instructor reserves the right to make minimal changes to the

following proposed topics and reading:

1. Language as a mirror of the mind? Key concepts and debates in the

science of language.

 Smith, Neil; Allott, Nicholas (2016). Chomsky: Ideas and Ideals

(3rd edition). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [Chapter 1:

The mirror of the mind & first section of Chapter 3: Language and

Psychology]

2. Animal communication, evolution of human language and innateness.

 Harley, T. (2010). Talking the Talk. Language, Psychology and

Science [Chapter 2: Animals]

 Aitchison, J. (1998). The Articulate Mammal. Routledge. [Chapter

2 and 3]

 Discussion of the Emmy Award-winning documentary: “Genie:

The Secret of a Wild Child” [available online].

3. Language comprehension. How do we recognise individual words and

process sentences?

Discussion on how to write argumentative essays. Analysis of

examples.

 Harley, T. (2010). Talking the Talk. Language, Psychology and

Science [Chapter 6 & 7 (relevant fragments)]

 Bebko, J, Schroeder H. & Weiss A. (2013). The McGurk effect in

children with autism and Asperger syndrome. Autism Research.

4. Speech production. Data analysis practice (from among others speech

errors).

 Harley, T. (2010). Talking the talk: language, psychology and

science. Psychology Press [Chapter 8: Speaking].

5. Rules in the mind: reading and morphology. Dyslexia. Further data

analysis practice.

 Harley, T. (2010). Talking the Talk. Language, Psychology and

Science [Chapter 6]

 McClelland, J.L. & Patterson, K. (2002). Rules or Connections in

Past-Tense Inflections: What does the Evidence Rule Out? In

Trends in Cognitive Science

 Pinker, S. & Ullman, M.T. (2002) The past and future of the past

tense. In Trends in Cognitive Science, vol.6 no.11

6. Neurobiological basis of language. Evidence from language disorders

(Broca’s and Wernicke’s aphasia).

 Traxler, M. (2012). Introduction to Psycholinguistics. WileyBlackwell.

[Chapter 13 and 14]

7. How do bilinguals ‘juggle’ two languages in one mind?

 Traxler, M. (2012). Introduction to Psycholinguistics. WileyBlackwell.

[Chapter 11]

8. Word meaning: how are meanings and concepts represented in the

brain?

 Traxler , M. J. (2012). Introduction to Psycholinguistics:

Understanding Language Science. Wiley-Blackwell [ pp. 79-87].

 Meteyard, L., Cuadrado, S. R., Bahrami, B., & Vigliocco, G. (2012).

Coming of age: A review of embodiment and the neuroscience of

semantics. Cortex, 48, pp. 788 – 804.

9. Language and memory (the declarative procedural distinction,

evidence from impairments, discussion on gender differences).

 Ullman, M. T. (2001). The neural basis of lexicon and grammar in

first and second language: the declarative/procedural model.

Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 4, 105-122

10. Implicit learning and language. Role of attention and awareness in

learning (this will likely be 2 sessions, with some experimental design

practice).

 Williams, J. N. (2009). Implicit learning and second language

acquisition. In W. C. Ritchie & T. K. Bhatia (Eds.), The New

Handbook of Second Language Acquisition (pp. 319-353):

Emerald.

 Paciorek, A. & Williams J. (2015). Semantic Implicit Learning. In

Rebuschat, P. (ed.) Implicit and Explicit Language Learning. John

Benjamins.

11. Individual differences and language aptitude.

 Reading to be confirmed.

12. Language and thought. Linguistic relativity.

 Reading to be confirmed.

13. *Time permitting: Aging – how does language processing change with

age?

 Shafto, M.A., & Tyler, L.K. (2014), “Language in the aging brain:

The network dynamics of cognitive decline and preservation.”

Science 346(6209), 583-587.

 Harley, T. (2010). Talking the Talk. Language, Psychology and

Science [Chapter 8 – relevant sections].

Efekty uczenia się: (tylko po angielsku)

On successful completion of the course, students should be able to:

 Recognize and recall major terms and concepts related to the

psychology of language

 Describe, explain and contrast major theories and their predictions

 Demonstrate an understanding of different methodologies and the

kinds of inference that can be drawn from the data that they generate

 Apply theories or findings to real world situations, including language

learning, teaching and rehabilitation

 Analyze and synthesize concepts and theories across topics, readings,

and discussions both orally and in writing

 Write a well-structured argumentative essay in which contrasting

theoretical positions are presented and discussed in the light of

judiciously chosen research findings

The course should also develop the following transferable skills:

 Developing evidence-based arguments

 Reading technical texts quickly and selecting and evaluating relevant

information

 Summarising an argument and constructing an argument

 Performing literature searches

 Writing a well-structured academic paper

Metody i kryteria oceniania: (tylko po angielsku)

 50% is based on one take-home essay. Essay topics will be given out

at the beginning of the course. The submission deadline is enforced in

the following way: submitting the essay past the deadline without sick

notice from a doctor or a major unforeseen event results in deduction

of a grade. Delay of more than three days results in failure of this

component.

 50% is the final exam (2h exam: one short question and one essay).

 There will be homework set for most of the classes.

 Students are required to pass each of the two components.

Attendance rules

Attendance is a necessary condition to pass the course. Students are

allowed two unexcused absences. In case of more absences, a sick leave

or a major life event will be considered a valid excuse. In the case of

additional absences, additional coursework will be required. Altogether

no more than four absences will be permitted.

Przedmiot nie jest oferowany w żadnym z aktualnych cykli dydaktycznych.
Opisy przedmiotów w USOS i USOSweb są chronione prawem autorskim.
Właścicielem praw autorskich jest Uniwersytet Warszawski.