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Eating Disorders: Theory and Practice

Informacje ogólne

Kod przedmiotu: 2500-EN-F-258 Kod Erasmus / ISCED: 14.4 / (0313) Psychologia
Nazwa przedmiotu: Eating Disorders: Theory and Practice
Jednostka: Wydział Psychologii
Grupy: Academic basket
Clinical Psychology basket
electives for 3,4 and 5 year
Punkty ECTS i inne: 4.00
Język prowadzenia: angielski
Rodzaj przedmiotu:

fakultatywne

Skrócony opis: (tylko po angielsku)

Welcome to the module of Working with Eating Disorder. From this module, you will learn about different types of Eating Disorders and the appropriate treatment options. This module weights more on the clinical practice side where you will learn to perform assessment, treatment and participate in multi-disciplinary team meetings.

Pełny opis: (tylko po angielsku)

Having an eating disorder is neither a lifestyle choice, a ‘diet gone wrong’, nor an attempt to get attention. A person with an eating disorder has a mental health condition. Eating disorders are serious, potentially fatal conditions, and most people with eating disorders need psychological treatment and/or physical health treatment (e.g. nutritional advice) to promote recovery.

An eating disorder is marked by extremes. It is present when a person experiences severe disturbance in eating behaviour, such as extreme reduction of food intake or extreme overeating, or feelings of extreme distress or concern about body weight or shape. Eating disorder stands out from other mental disorders due to its complexity and high co-morbidity.

Eating disorders are treatable medical illnesses with complex underlying psychological and biological causes. They frequently co-exist with other psychiatric disorders such as depression, substance abuse, or anxiety disorders. People with eating disorders also can suffer from numerous other physical health complications, such as heart conditions or kidney failure, which can lead to death.

Psychological and medicinal treatments are effective for many eating disorders. However, the effectiveness is jeopardised when many patients do not think that they are will, such as patients with Anorexia Nervosa, or patients with Bulimia Nervosa who may turn to food for emotion regulation.

The aim of this course is to provide a summary of eating disorders and the treatment options. It focuses on issues around potential cause, diagnosis, early intervention, and treatment options, concentrating primarily on psychological therapies and baseline medical interventions.

The course will particularly focus on one treatment approach: CBT-ED Oxford Model. This is a treatment approach developed and currently piloted at Warneford Hospital, Oxford; it aims to address the broad maintaining mechanisms of eating disorder.

The module provider has experience in investigating, developing and delivering treatment therapies and long-term care programmes to those with eating disorders. This module will introduce the concept of the major Eating Disorders and the following psychological treatment options in combination with medical treatment:

1. Support and Monitoring

2. Guided Self-help

3. CBT-E

4. CBT-ED Oxford Model

5. Family-based Treatment (FBT)

6. Focal Psychodynamic Therapy (FPT) for Anorexia Nervosa

Literatura: (tylko po angielsku)

Below are the 12 main topics. Some topics will extend beyond one

lecture. All topics will involve lecture with practical exercise where

students will be invited to role play as psychologists, patients and

different members of the multi-disciplinary team.

1. Introduction to Eating Disorder and its origins and key maintainingmechanism of Eating Disorder

 Fairburn, C. G. (2013). Overcoming binge eating: The proven program to learn why you binge and how you can stop. Guilford Press. Chapter 2 (Mandatory)

 Fairburn, C. G. (2008). Cognitive behavior therapy and eating disorders. Guilford Press. Chapter 2 (Mandatory)

 Fairburn, C. G. (2008). Cognitive behavior therapy and eating disorders. Guilford Press. Chapter 13 (Mandatory)

2. Comorbidities

 Fairburn, C. G. (2008). Cognitive behavior therapy and eating disorders. Guilford Press. Chapter 16 (Mandatory)

 Blinder, B. J., Cumella, E. J., & Sanathara, V. A. (2006). Psychiatric comorbidities of female inpatients with eating disorders. Psychosomatic medicine, 68(3), 454-462.

 Herpertz-Dahlmann, B. (2009). Adolescent eating disorders: definitions, symptomatology, epidemiology and comorbidity. Child and adolescent psychiatric clinics of North America, 18(1), 31-47.

 Swinbourne, J., Hunt, C., Abbott, M., Russell, J., St Clare, T., & Touyz, S. (2012). The comorbidity between eating disorders and anxiety disorders: Prevalence in an eating disorder sample and anxiety disorder sample. Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 46(2), 118-131. (Mandatory)

3. The treatment options for Eating Disorder

 Kass, A. E., Kolko, R. P., & Wilfley, D. E. (2013). Psychological treatments for eating disorders. Current opinion in psychiatry, 26(6), 549. (Mandatory)

 Fairburn, C. G. (2013). Overcoming binge eating: The proven program to learn why you binge and how you can stop. Guilford Press. Chapter 8

 Fairburn, C. G. (2008). Cognitive behavior therapy and eating disorders. Guilford Press. Chapter 3 (Mandatory)

 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. (2017). Eating disorders: Recognition and treatment. NICE. (Mandatory)

4. Assessment and risk management – Actions that take place before treatment.

 Fairburn, C. G. (2008). Cognitive behavior therapy and eating disorders. Guilford Press. Chapter 4 (Mandatory)

 Eating Disorder Assessment Form from Oxford Health Foundation Trust – NHS

 Eating Disorder Assessment Report Template from Oxford Health Foundation Trust – NHS

5. Working with eating disorder part 1

 Fairburn, C. G. (2008). Cognitive behavior therapy and eating disorders. Guilford Press. Chapter 5-6 (Mandatory)

 Fairburn, C. G. (2013). Overcoming binge eating: The proven program to learn why you binge and how you can stop. Guilford Press. Page 119 – 145

 Risk Assessment Template from Oxford Health Foundation Trust – NHS

 Care Plan Template from Oxford Health Foundation Trust – NHS

6. Working with eating disorder part 2

 Fairburn, C. G. (2008). Cognitive behavior therapy and eating disorders. Guilford Press. Chapter 7 (Mandatory)

 Fairburn, C. G. (2013). Overcoming binge eating: The proven program to learn why you binge and how you can stop. Guilford Press. Page 146-182

7. Working with eating disorder part 3

 Fairburn, C. G. (2008). Cognitive behavior therapy and eating disorders. Guilford Press. Chapter 8-10 (Mandatory)

 Fairburn, C. G. (2013). Overcoming binge eating: The proven program to learn why you binge and how you can stop. Guilford Press. Page 183-209

8. Working with eating disorder part 4

 Fairburn, C. G. (2008). Cognitive behavior therapy and eating disorders. Guilford Press. Chapter 11-12 (Mandatory)

9. Development of CBT-ED Oxford model (lecture with practical exercise: students will be invited to sit on a mock development panel to develop CBT-ED)

 Fairburn, C. G. (2013). Overcoming binge eating: The proven program to learn why you binge and how you can stop. Guilford Press. Page 210 - 214 (Mandatory)

 Patient Folder Template from Oxford Health Foundation Trust – NHS

10. Working with multi-disciplinary team for patients with eating disorder

 Fairburn, C. G. (2013). Overcoming binge eating: The proven program to learn why you binge and how you can stop. Guilford Press. Page 66-83 (Mandatory)

11. Discharge + Maintenance plan

 Patient Folder Template from Oxford Health Foundation Trust – NHS

12. For patients who do not respond to recommended treatment for eating disorder.

 Manual for Focal Psychodynamic Therapy (FPT) for Anorexia Nervosa

Book chapters and Oxford Health Foundation Trust materials will be provided by the lecturer in either electronic or hard copy format.

Efekty uczenia się: (tylko po angielsku)

Intended Knowledge Outcomes

At the end of the module the students should be able to:

 Differentiate between the different forms of eating disorder

 Delineate and compare the various causal developmental processes

for different forms of eating disorder

 Differentiate between and critically compare the usefulness of the

different treatment options of eating disorder

Intended Skill Outcomes

By the end of the module students should be able to:

 Interpret empirical information / data relating to eating disorder case

studies

 Select a likely diagnosis of a specific form of eating disorder based on

the initial assessment

 Apply a case formulation framework and diagnostic assessment to

eating disorder case studies

Metody i kryteria oceniania: (tylko po angielsku)

1. Short quiz that include 10 questions at the beginning of each class except the first class. All questions are from the mandatory reading materials for the previous class (7 multiple choice questions and 3 open questions). This contributes to 40% of student’s final grade.

2. 2000 words essay: Critical evaluation on a relevant topic. Suggested topics will be given to students during the first lecture. Detailed requirement will be given to student during the first class. Instructions on critical writing will be given throughout the module based on the generic criteria below. This contributes to 60% of student’s final grade.

Generic Criteria for the Essay

90-100%

An excellent critical and complete demonstration of understanding in all key areas of knowledge relevant to the work and demonstrating an innovative and creative approach. Evidence throughout the work of a sustained ability to synthesise and interpret complex concepts, to make inferences and to provide an original and/or compelling argument and discussion. Excellent structure and immaculate presentation, with cogent use of academic language and grounded in a pertinent and substantial selection of source materials. Excellent use of appropriate analytical and research methods and addresses ethical considerations in an informed and perceptive manner. Exceptional ability to link and critically analyse theory and practice where appropriate.

80-89%

An excellent, critical and systematic demonstration of understanding in all key areas of knowledge relevant to the work. Evidence throughout of the ability to synthesise and interpret complex concepts to provide a compelling argument and discussion. Very good structure and presentation, with confident use of academic language and grounded in a relevant and extensive selection of source materials. Excellent use of appropriate analytical and research methods and fully addresses ethical considerations. Excellent ability to link and critically analyse theory and practice where appropriate.

70-79%

An excellent, critical and organised demonstration of understanding in all key areas of knowledge relevant to the work. Evidence throughout of the ability to synthesise and interpret diverse concepts to provide a sound argument and discussion. Good structure and presentation, with fluent use of academic language and grounded in an appropriate and comprehensive selection of source materials. Very effective use of appropriate analytical and research methods and consideration of ethical implications. Very good ability to link and critically analyse theory and practice where appropriate.

60-69%

A proficient, clearly stated and analytical demonstration of understanding in all key areas of knowledge relevant to the work. Evidence of the ability to integrate and analyse diverse concepts in a rational and logical argument and discussion. Well-structured and clearly presented work, with fluent use of academic language and utilising a relevant and extensive range of source materials. Effective use of appropriate analytical and research methods and consideration of ethical issues. Good ability to link and critically analyse theory and practice where appropriate.

50-59%

An acceptable and substantiated demonstration of understanding in all key areas of knowledge relevant to the work. Evidence of the ability to integrate and analyse diverse concepts in a reasoned and valid argument and discussion. Adequately structured and presented work, with clear use of academic language and reference to a sufficient range of relevant source materials. Adequate use of appropriate analytical and research methods and does address ethical considerations. Effective linking of theory and practice where appropriate.

40-49%

A limited, insufficient and/or inaccurate understanding in key areas of knowledge relevant to the work. Insufficient evidence of ability to integrate and analyse concepts to provide a valid discussion. Unacceptably structured and presented work, with insufficient use of academic language and conventions. A limited range of source materials is used. Limited or ineffective use of analytical and research methods and limited coverage of ethical considerations. Inadequate linking of theory and practice where applicable.

30-39%

A descriptive and/or narrative account, with little critical and/or flawed understanding of key areas of knowledge relevant to the work. Insufficient evidence of ability to discuss fundamental concepts. Unclear and and/or un-evidenced argument and discussion. Poorly structured and presented work, with little use of academic language and conventions. A narrow and/or inappropriate range of source materials and analytical and research methods is used. Failure to identify ethical considerations and to link theory and practice where applicable.

20-29%

A weakly descriptive and/or narrative account, with no analytical content and/or significant inaccuracies in understanding of key areas of knowledge relevant to the work. Little or no evidence of research and the ability to discuss fundamental concepts. No awareness of ethical issues. Unclear and un-sourced arguments and discussion. Flawed structure and presentation, with negligible attention to academic language or conventions. Some or all source materials are unreferenced and/or irrelevant. Failure to link theory and practice where applicable. To obtain a mark of 20% the work must show evidence of a genuine attempt to demonstrate some knowledge of the subject.

0-19%

The work is almost entirely derivative and therefore lacks analysis or reflection and shows little or no knowledge or understanding of key areas relevant to the work. No evidence of research and the ability to discuss fundamental concepts. The presentation and referencing do not conform to the standards required.

Up to four class hours unexcused absence is allowed and further absences are only possible with formal excuse up to 4 class hours absence. This is to ensure that student will be able to meet all the learning outcomes.

Students must respect the principles of academic integrity. Cheating and plagiarism (including copying work from your previous submitted assignments, other students, internet or other sources) are serious violations that are punishable, and instructors are required to report all cases to the administration.

Zajęcia w cyklu "Semestr letni 2019/20" (w trakcie)

Okres: 2020-02-17 - 2020-08-02
Wybrany podział planu:


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Typ zajęć: Seminarium, 30 godzin więcej informacji
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Zaliczenie: Przedmiot - Zaliczenie na ocenę
Seminarium - Zaliczenie na ocenę
Opisy przedmiotów w USOS i USOSweb są chronione prawem autorskim.
Właścicielem praw autorskich jest Uniwersytet Warszawski.