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Anthropocene Anthropologies

General data

Course ID: 3102-FAAN
Erasmus code / ISCED: 14.7 Kod klasyfikacyjny przedmiotu składa się z trzech do pięciu cyfr, przy czym trzy pierwsze oznaczają klasyfikację dziedziny wg. Listy kodów dziedzin obowiązującej w programie Socrates/Erasmus, czwarta (dotąd na ogół 0) – ewentualne uszczegółowienie informacji o dyscyplinie, piąta – stopień zaawansowania przedmiotu ustalony na podstawie roku studiów, dla którego przedmiot jest przeznaczony. / (0314) Sociology and cultural studies The ISCED (International Standard Classification of Education) code has been designed by UNESCO.
Course title: Anthropocene Anthropologies
Name in Polish: Anthropocene Anthropologies
Organizational unit: Institute of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology
Course groups: (in Polish) II rok studiów magisterskich
(in Polish) III rok studiów licencjackich
(in Polish) Moduł L2: Antropologia globalizującego się świata i mobilności
Courses in foreign languages
ECTS credit allocation (and other scores): (not available) Basic information on ECTS credits allocation principles:
  • the annual hourly workload of the student’s work required to achieve the expected learning outcomes for a given stage is 1500-1800h, corresponding to 60 ECTS;
  • the student’s weekly hourly workload is 45 h;
  • 1 ECTS point corresponds to 25-30 hours of student work needed to achieve the assumed learning outcomes;
  • weekly student workload necessary to achieve the assumed learning outcomes allows to obtain 1.5 ECTS;
  • work required to pass the course, which has been assigned 3 ECTS, constitutes 10% of the semester student load.

view allocation of credits
Language: English
Type of course:

optional courses

Prerequisites (description):

(in Polish) The course is intended for graduate students.

Short description:

The Anthropocene is a term used to denote a new geological era – one defined by human-induced climate change, ocean acidification, species extinction, and other planetary transformations. This experimental new course explores this topic from a diversity of ethnographic and transdisciplinary perspectives. What social and political processes produce the Anthropocene? How are human relations with other living and non-living beings transformed? What are the possible or necessary responses? How is the Anthropocene experienced in specific ethnographic sites?

Full description:

The Anthropocene has also been among the most generative concepts in the humanities and social science in recent years. This experimental new course explores this topic from a diversity of ethnographic and transdisciplinary perspectives, drawing on writings by anthropologists, philosophers, historians, sociologists, and others. Some of the key questions raised include: What social and political processes produce the Anthropocene? What are the possible or necessary responses to the dramatic planetary change? How is the Anthropocene experienced in specific ethnographic sites? What does it mean when we call the present Anthropocene, and might other terms be more accurate or productive, such as the Capitalocene? How are human relations with other living and non-living beings transformed? The plural form in the course title – Anthropocene Anthropologies – points to the diversity of approaches and understandings to be explored, but also to the variety of emerging ways of being human in this human-made age.

Bibliography:

Preliminary reading list:

Chakrabarty, Dipesh. 2009. ‘The Climate of History: Four Theses’, Critical Inquiry 35(2):197-222.

2018. ‘Anthropocene Time’, History & Theory 57(1):5-32.

Ellis, Erle C. 2018. Anthropocene: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Haraway, Donna J. 2016. Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chtulucene. Durham: Duke University Press.

Hecht, Gabrielle. 2018. ‘Interscalar Vehicles for an African Anthropocene: On Waste, Temporality, and Violence’, Cultural Anthropology 33(1):109 141.

Howe, Cymene. 2014. ‘Anthropocenic Ecoauthority: The Winds of Oaxaca’, Anthropological Quarterly 87(2):381-404.

Klein, Naomi. 2014. This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate. London: Penguin Books.

Latour, Bruno. 2016. Facing Gaia: Eight Lectures on the New Climatic Regime. Cambridge: Polity.

2018. Down to Earth: Politics in the New Climatic Regime. Cambridge: Polity.

Moore, Amelia. 2015. ‘Anthropocene Anthropology: Reconceptualizing Contemporary Global Change’, Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 22:27 46.

Moore, Jason W. 2015a. ‘Anthropocene or Capitalocene? Nature, History, and the Crisis of Capitalism’, in Jason W. Moore (ed.), Anthropocene or Capitalocene? Nature, History, and the Crisis of Capitalism, 1 13. Oakland: PM Press.

2015b. ‘The Rise of Cheap Nature’, in Jason W. Moore (ed.), Anthropocene or Capitalocene? Nature, History, and the Crisis of Capitalism, 78 115. Oakland: PM Press.

Swyngendouw, Eric. 2015. ‘Depoliticized Environments and the Promises of the Anthropocene’, in Raymond L. Bryant (ed.), The International Handbook of Political Ecology, 131 145. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.

Tsing, Anna L. 2015. The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Tsing, Anna L., Heather Swanson, Elaine Gan, and Nils Bubandt (eds). 2017. Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Learning outcomes: (in Polish)

Po ukończeniu zajęć studenci potrafią:

- analitycznie myśleć i dokonywać obserwacji i krytyki przemian społeczno-kulturowych

- posługiwać się wybranym językiem obcym na poziomie B2+ Europejskiego Systemu Opisu Kształcenia Językowego

- posługiwać się specjalistyczną terminologią z zakresu etnologii i antropologii kulturowej w języku obcym

Assessment methods and assessment criteria:

Course essay (term paper) of 2,500 words. Students will be asked to submit 250-word abstracts of their prospective essays mid-semester. Students are free to pick a topic of their choice, as long as it speaks to the overall theme of the course. The essays should also engage with at least selected readings discussed during the semester, plus any other relevant literature (which the students will be expected to identify).

In addition, students will have the opportunity to volunteer to make a presentation on one of the required readings during the semester. A successful presentation equals half a grade up on the final score.

This course is not currently offered.
Course descriptions are protected by copyright.
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